♥ Loving Sylvia Plath ♥
diaisbored:

You are the one Solid the spaces lean on, envious. You are the baby in the barn.
Plath please.
#JesseBear #love #sylviaplath #ariel #dog #dogstagram #goldendoodle #smartypants #rayban #clubmaster

diaisbored:

You are the one
Solid the spaces lean on, envious.
You are the baby in the barn.

Plath please.

#JesseBear #love #sylviaplath #ariel #dog #dogstagram #goldendoodle #smartypants #rayban #clubmaster

via http://booksonmycat.tumblr.com/
The “Pets-and-Sylvia-Plath”-week part 3!

Another week, another topic. I think it’s time again for a cute week aka known as the "Pets-Reading-Sylvia-Plath"-week or in this case the “Pets-and-Sylvia-Plath”-week.

I hope you like!

And remember, you can always submit to: lovingsylviaplath@gmail.com

CrashCourse: John Green reads “Lady Lazarus" by Sylvia Plath, written 23-29 October 1962

thecrashcourse:

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath: Crash Course Literature 216

In which John Green teaches you about the poetry of Sylvia Plath. When a lot of people think about Sylvia Plath, they think about her struggles with mental illness and her eventual suicide. Her actual work can get lost in the shuffle a bit, so this video really tries to focus on the poetry. You’ll learn about Sylvia Plath’s role as a feminist poet, and you’ll also learn about her extraordinary ability to recreate the experiences of real life in beautiful and relatable way.

tweetspeakpoetry:

Dance party. The poets are warming up for tomorrow.Who will you decide to take to work?http://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/2014/05/28/take-poet-work-day-coming-july-16/

tweetspeakpoetry:

Dance party. The poets are warming up for tomorrow.

Who will you decide to take to work?

http://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/2014/05/28/take-poet-work-day-coming-july-16/

tweetspeakpoetry:

Take Your Poet to Work Day is coming Wednesday, July 16
Just one more day until Take Your Poet to Work Day. Meet our final poet in this year’s collection, Sylvia Plath.
What if you could take your favorite poet to work with you? Imagine finding a poet in your cash drawer when you open it to make change. Or think about how much fun you could have with your favorite poet answering all your calls for the day. We can’t wait to see what our favorite poets will be doing in your workplaces on Take Your Poet to Work Day.
To help you play and celebrate with us, we’re releasing poets each week in a compact, convenient format you can tuck in your pocket, tool belt, or lunchbox.

Last year, we gave you Sara Teasdale, Pablo Neruda, T. S. Eliot, Rumi, Edgar Allan Poe, and the reclusive Emily Dickinson (for folks who work at home). We even released a full collection, The Haiku Masters: Matsuo Basho, Yosa Buson, and Kobayashi Issa.
This year, we’re building on the collection, adding one new poet each Wednesday, up until the big day. We started the celebration over the past few weeks with Langston Hughes, Adrienne Rich,  John Keats, William Butler Yeats, and Christina Rossetti. Today, we introduce a 20th-century American poet, Sylvia Plath.
Get all the details and a shareable infographic about Take Your Poet to Work Day.

Click here for a downloadable version of Sylvia Plath Take Your Poet to Work Day Printable that you can print, and color and cut out for the big day.
Download your Free Take Your Poet to Work Day Coloring Book.

tweetspeakpoetry:

Take Your Poet to Work Day is coming Wednesday, July 16

Just one more day until Take Your Poet to Work Day. Meet our final poet in this year’s collection, Sylvia Plath.

What if you could take your favorite poet to work with you? Imagine finding a poet in your cash drawer when you open it to make change. Or think about how much fun you could have with your favorite poet answering all your calls for the day. We can’t wait to see what our favorite poets will be doing in your workplaces on Take Your Poet to Work Day.

To help you play and celebrate with us, we’re releasing poets each week in a compact, convenient format you can tuck in your pocket, tool belt, or lunchbox.
Last year, we gave you Sara Teasdale, Pablo Neruda, T. S. EliotRumi, Edgar Allan Poe, and the reclusive Emily Dickinson (for folks who work at home). We even released a full collection, The Haiku Masters: Matsuo Basho, Yosa Buson, and Kobayashi Issa.

This year, we’re building on the collection, adding one new poet each Wednesday, up until the big day. We started the celebration over the past few weeks with Langston Hughes, Adrienne Rich,  John Keats, William Butler Yeats, and Christina Rossetti. Today, we introduce a 20th-century American poet, Sylvia Plath.

Get all the details and a shareable infographic about Take Your Poet to Work Day.

http://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Sylvia-Plath-Take-Your-Poet-to-Work-Day-Printable-768x1024.jpg

Click here for a downloadable version of Sylvia Plath Take Your Poet to Work Day Printable that you can print, and color and cut out for the big day.

Download your Free Take Your Poet to Work Day Coloring Book.


Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes were featured in The Guardian/The Observer’s "The 10 best power couples"-list from Saturday, February 16, 2013:
Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes are poetry’s posthumous power couple
Hughes and Plath are poetry’s posthumous power couple. During their marriage, Plath tended to play second fiddle to him. In Al Alvarez’s “The Savage God: A Study of Suicide”, he speculates about what it must have been like having two poets of their calibre under one roof: “When two genuinely original, ambitious, full-time poets join in one marriage… every poem one writes probably feels to the other as though it had been dug out of his or her own skull.” It must, at times, have been unbearable to see the Muse being unfaithful to you – with your partner.
***
Picture: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes on their honeymoon, Paris, 1956 Warren J. Plath/Mortimer Rare Book Room, Smith College

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes were featured in The Guardian/The Observer’s "The 10 best power couples"-list from Saturday, February 16, 2013:

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes are poetry’s posthumous power couple

Hughes and Plath are poetry’s posthumous power couple. During their marriage, Plath tended to play second fiddle to him. In Al Alvarez’s “The Savage God: A Study of Suicide”, he speculates about what it must have been like having two poets of their calibre under one roof: “When two genuinely original, ambitious, full-time poets join in one marriage… every poem one writes probably feels to the other as though it had been dug out of his or her own skull.” It must, at times, have been unbearable to see the Muse being unfaithful to you – with your partner.

***

Picture: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes on their honeymoon, Paris, 1956 
Warren J. Plath/Mortimer Rare Book Room, Smith College

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes photographed by Rollie McKenna in 1959, Willow Street, Boston

© Rosalie Thorne McKenna Foundation

via http://npg.org.uk/ & http://ccp.uair.arizona.edu/

Sylvia and Ted “interrupted in a spat,” Chalot Square, London, July 25, 1960 photographed by Hans Beacham for a portfolio of images of British writers

"They were sullen. Hughes was rude. He was going to get more attention than she, and she didn’t like that while he did. He invited me outside and told me I needed to know that he loathed photographers". Hughes particularly wanted to keep Plath out of the way. "His wish, of course, forced me to photograph them together", Beacham said; and later; Hughes acknowledged that he had been "an ogre."

—Diane Middlebrook, Her Husband: Hughes and Plath-a Marriage, 2003

Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes photographed by Ramsey and Muspratt in Cambridge, England in 1956

Via “These Ghostly Archives 5 : Reanimating the Past" by Gail Crowther and Peter K. Steinberg in Plath Profiles Volume 6 (2013) & loftyimages.co.uk

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes! ♥
You would have been married 58 years today! Too bad it all ended like it did. RIP!
Plath and Hughes first met on 25 February 1956 at party in Cambridge.  They married only four months later on 16 June 1956 at St George the Martyr, Holborn, Camden, London in honor of Bloomsday. They have been married for 6 years and four months till Plath commited suicide on 11 February 1963. Plath and Hughes have been separated for five months since September 1962, but they never got a divorce. In fact, word has it that they were on their way to a reconciliation.
Picture: Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes photographed against Brooklyn Heights, New York City in 1958 by Oscar Williams; Lilly Library, Indiana University at Bloomington, Indiana.
Via “These Ghostly Archives 3" by Gail Crowther and Peter K. Steinberg in Plath Profiles Volume 4 (2011)

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes!

You would have been married 58 years today! Too bad it all ended like it did. RIP!

Plath and Hughes first met on 25 February 1956 at party in Cambridge.  They married only four months later on 16 June 1956 at St George the Martyr, Holborn, Camden, London in honor of Bloomsday. They have been married for 6 years and four months till Plath commited suicide on 11 February 1963. Plath and Hughes have been separated for five months since September 1962, but they never got a divorce. In fact, word has it that they were on their way to a reconciliation.

Picture: Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes photographed against Brooklyn Heights, New York City in 1958 by Oscar Williams; Lilly Library, Indiana University at Bloomington, Indiana.

Via “These Ghostly Archives 3" by Gail Crowther and Peter K. Steinberg in Plath Profiles Volume 4 (2011)

"Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes in Photographs"-Week!

I think the title says it all! Enjoy! ;)

sketchyfeelings:

Deeper Than Dark pt. 2. A graphic adaptation of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar