♥ Loving Sylvia Plath ♥
I wonder now, on August 6, lying here on my white bed, listening to the rain: slant long and hard on the roof outside my windows coming down liquidly, drippingly plural and generous from the low gray skies, fluently saying what I choose to make it say. Slanting down the screen in milky, translucent streams, prolific, uncaringly beneficent, it heals or annoys, (as we humans choose to translate it.) And I love it because of the sound, and the gray pluvial walls of it dropping down, closing in.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 6 August 1952
Three years ago, the hot, sticky August rain fell big and wet as I sat listlessly on my porch at home, crying over the way summer would not come again - never the same. […] August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 8 August 1952
And I look at the windshield wipers cutting an arch out of the sprinkled raindrops on the glass. Click-click. Clip-clip. Tick-tick. snip-snip. And it goes on and on. I could smash the measured clicking sound that haunts me - draining away life, and dreams, and idle reveries. Hard, sharp, ticks. I hate them. Measuring thought, infinite space, by cogs and wheels. Can you understand? Someone, somewhere, can you understand me a little, love me a little? For all my despair, for all my ideals, for all that - I love life. But it is hard, and I have so much - so very much to learn -
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1950
Rain on roof outside window, gray light, deep covers and warm blankets. Rain and nip of autumn in air; nostalgia, itch to work better and bigger. That crisp edge of autumn.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 26 August 1956 in Paris
May 13 - today I bought a raincoat - no, that was yesterday - yesterday I bought a raincoat with a frivolous pink lining that does good to my eyes because I have never ever had anything pink-colored, and it was much too expensive - I bought it with a month’s news office pay, and soon I will not have any money to do anything more with because I am buying clothes because I love them and they are exactly right, if I pay enough. And I feel dry and a bit sick whenever I say “I’ll take it” and the smiling woman goes away with my money because she doesn’t know I really don’t have money at all at all. For three villanelles I have a blue-and-white pin-striped cotton cord suit dress, a black silk date dress and a grey raincoat with a frivolous pink lining.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 13 May 1953
Today is the first of August. It is hot, steamy and wet. It is raining. I am tempted to write a poem. But I remember what it said on one rejection slip: After a heavy rainfall, poems titled RAIN pour in from across the nation.
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, August 1950
The “Sylvia-Plath-on-Rain”-Week!

It’s only August and I was hoping to finally enjoy a few days off and catch some sun at the sea in Holland… yeah… It has been raining for the past 10 days straight and it seems the summer is saying its premature goodbyes. Even my turtle seems to know the fall is coming, because she doesn’t want to eat anymore. Looks as if she prepares herself for hibernation.

That’s why I thought we might have a "Sylvia-Plath-on-Rain"-week! ;) Plath’s journals, letters and poems are filled with wonderful descriptions of rainy days and rain related situations. This week, I’m going to present you a few rainy quotes from The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath.

I hope you like! :)

poemsofthequiet:

Sylvia Plath, possibly around the years of ‘60-63 (?) (possibly right before her death). For some reason I tend to prefer her during this time. There’s something about the way she appears around the 60s. I also prefer her dark hair and bangs over her blonde locs of the 50s. My favorite is the second photo, it seems like a poem is creeping up inside of her head, or maybe she’s just simply lost in thought. 

(Photo source)

Actually these pictures were taken in July 1959 during the road trip Plath and Hughes took together. The first pic was taken at at Rock Lake, Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada and the second one at Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, USA.

You can find boths pictures along with three others from this trip in The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath.

via http://jensineeckwall.com/

Sylvia Plath’s the Bell Jar Series

By Jensine Eckwall

Etching and aquatint with hand-applied watercolor.

Jensine’s Tumblr: http://jensineeckwall.tumblr.com/

Jensine’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jensineeckwallillo

You can buy Jensine’s prints here: http://www.inprnt.com/gallery/jensine/

***

The illustrations are inspired by and captioned with the following quotes from The Bell Jar and other works by Sylvia Plath:

"I Was Supposed to be Having the Time of My Life."
The Bell Jar, Chapter One

**

"I Am Horribly Limited."
1950, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

**

"I Am, I Am, I Am"
The Bell Jar, Chapter Twenty

**

"I Didn’t Want Any Flowers"
—”Tulips”, 18 March 1961, The Collected Poems

**

"We’ll Act as if This Were a Bad Dream"
The Bell Jar, Chapter Twenty

**

"I Was Open to the Circulating Air"
The Bell Jar, Chapter Eighteen

***

Jensine’s own Sylvia Plath’s the Bell Jar Series tumblr post: here

I Didn’t Want Any Flowers (Test Print) in color: here

We’ll Act As If This Were A Bad Dream, payne’s grey variant proof: here

Submitted by Marlaina from http://lionsroar83.tumblr.com/:

"Here are my cats reading Sylvia’s books! Bee has ‘Ariel’ and Gemini has ‘Sylvia’s Unabridged Journals’."

via moonshineandlemon.blogspot.com (see for recipe)

**Sylvia Plath | Fig and Plum Torte**


Maria K. from her blog moonshineandlemon.blogspot.com describes her cake in the following way:

"Not wishing to choose between figs and plums, I decided to use both in this heavenly combination of two fruit; more fig than plum, more torte than cake."

Today’s cake is not exactly a cake Sylvia Plath made, but it is one she could have made, because figs and plums were always present in her writing. The most prominent examples are of course the fig tree portrayed in The Bell Jar ("I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree…") or one of her earlier poems published in November 1950 in Seventeen magazine with the title "Ode to a Bitten Plum".

In her Letters Home Sylvia mentions seeing fig- and plum-trees. And in her Unabridged Journals she writes on 6 March 1956:

"I was thinking of the few times in my life I have felt I was all alive, tensed, using everything in me: mind and body, instead of giving away little crumbs, lest the audience be glutted with too much plum-cake."

Apart from this, there are are many poems in Sylvia Plath’sThe Collected Poems" that contain images of figs and plums:

"The Colossus"
Counting the red stars and those of plum-color.

"The Zookeeper’s Wife"
Blueblack, a spectacular plum fruit.

"Nick and the Candlestick"
They weld to me like plums.

"Jilted"
While like an early summer plum,
Puny, green, and tart,
Droops upon its wizened stem
My lean, unripened heart.

"The Beggars"
These goatish tragedians who
Hawk misfortune like figs and chickens

"Departure"
The figs on the fig tree in the yard are green;

"The Net-Menders"
Sun grains their crow-colors,
Purples the fig in the leaf’s shadow, turns the dust pink.

So, here you go… The Fig and Plum Torte, which could also be called The Bell Jar Cake! ;)

via paperandsalt.org (see for recipe)
**Sylvia Plath: Lemon Pudding Cakes**
In her awesome article Baking with Sylvia (hence the name for the theme week!) published on 15 February 2003 in The Guardian, Kate Moses, the author of Wintering: The Novel of Sylvia Plath, tells us that Sylvia Plath documented in her 1962 daily calendar that she made lemon pudding cake when she was writing “Lady Lazarus”, some time between 23-29 October.
Some time beweeen 3 January 1957 and 11 March 1957, Sylvia Plath wrote in her Journals: "Instead of studying Locke, for instance, or writing - I go make an apple pie, or study The Joy Of Cooking, reading it like a rare novel."
Nicole from paperandsalt.org says that the recipe “is nearly identical to the1950s The Joy of Cooking”. So it is highly probable that Sylvia Plath made exactly the same cake while composing one of the greatest poems ever written! ;) 
Recreate and enjoy! ;)

via paperandsalt.org (see for recipe)

**Sylvia Plath: Lemon Pudding Cakes**

In her awesome article Baking with Sylvia (hence the name for the theme week!) published on 15 February 2003 in The Guardian, Kate Moses, the author of Wintering: The Novel of Sylvia Plath, tells us that Sylvia Plath documented in her 1962 daily calendar that she made lemon pudding cake when she was writing “Lady Lazarus”, some time between 23-29 October.

Some time beweeen 3 January 1957 and 11 March 1957, Sylvia Plath wrote in her Journals: "Instead of studying Locke, for instance, or writing - I go make an apple pie, or study The Joy Of Cooking, reading it like a rare novel."

Nicole from paperandsalt.org says that the recipe “is nearly identical to the1950s The Joy of Cooking”. So it is highly probable that Sylvia Plath made exactly the same cake while composing one of the greatest poems ever written! ;) 

Recreate and enjoy! ;)

**Sylvia Plath’s Heavenly Sponge Cake**

The last time Rose came to tea I had a big fancy sponge cake made with 6 eggs (…). I broached it for Rose. She made a praising remark. Gobbled it.

—written 1962, Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath


For the recipe, see Peter K. Steinberg’s blog sylviaplathinfo.blogspot.com:

"Very light (though heavier and more dense than angel food cake) with a scrumptiously crispy sugary top and a nice flavor of lemon throughout, which surprised us as there is really so little in there. We recommend cutting large portions and serving with a hot beverage (tea or mocha, perhaps) and your favorite book by or about Sylvia Plath."

(…)

"Plath made various sponge cakes in her time: some lemon, some orange, and likely some other. She made a sponge cake several times in North Tawton."

(…)

"She (…) made a sponge cake on 21 April 1962 (…) and two days after she wrote "Elm".


For a vegan sponge cake version, see Charlotte White’s recipe from the Food Network UK: http://www.foodnetwork.co.uk/recipes/vegan-sponge-cake.html

yummybooksblog:

A lemon meringue pie for Sylvia Plath. 
Read the full post and get the recipe HERE


“Baked a lemon meringue pie, cooled lemon custard & crust on cold bathroom windowsill, stirring in black night & stars.”
"I make a damn good lemon meringue pie.”  
"Tonight I shall somehow manage dinner for 5 & coffee for an extra two with ease. My trusty angel-topped lemon meringue pie - if I serve a dinner once a week I lose my nervousness."
—Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 28 August 1957 - 14 October 1958

yummybooksblog:

A lemon meringue pie for Sylvia Plath. 

Read the full post and get the recipe HERE

“Baked a lemon meringue pie, cooled lemon custard & crust on cold bathroom windowsill, stirring in black night & stars.”

"I make a damn good lemon meringue pie.” 

"Tonight I shall somehow manage dinner for 5 & coffee for an extra two with ease. My trusty angel-topped lemon meringue pie - if I serve a dinner once a week I lose my nervousness."

—Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 28 August 1957 - 14 October 1958

lovingsylvia:

Nick and the Candlestick

I am a miner. The light burns blue.
Waxy stalactites
Drip and thicken, tears

The earthen womb
Exudes from its dead boredom.
Black bat airs

Wrap me, raggy shawls,
Cold homicides.
They weld to me like plums.

Old cave of calcium
Icicles, old echoer.
Even the newts are white,

Those holy Joes.
And the fish, the fish——
Christ! They are panes of ice,

A vice of knives,
A piranha
Religion, drinking

Its first communion out of my live toes.
The candle
Gulps and recovers its small altitude,

Its yellows hearten.
O love, how did you get here?
O embryo

Remembering, even in sleep,
Your crossed position.
The blood blooms clean

In you, ruby.
The pain
You wake to is not yours.

Love, love,
I have hung our cave with roses,
With soft rugs——

The last of Victoriana.
Let the stars
Plummet to their dark address,

Let the mercuric
Atoms that cripple drip
Into the terrible well,

You are the one
Solid the spaces lean on, envious.
You are the baby in the barn.

—29 October 1962

***

For Nicholas Farrar Hughes
(January 17, 1962 – March 16, 2009)